White House Repeats Same Old Message After Virtually Every Jobs Report

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In the wake of Friday’s jobs report stating that only 80,000 jobs had been created and unemployment remained unchanged at 8.2%, the Obama administration, through Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, Alan Krueger, said “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report and it is informative to consider each report in the context of other data that are becoming available.”

Many conservatives have become tired hearing the same things from the White House over and over, so let’s look back to previous jobs reports and see how they have responded over the past three years (Click HERE for links to the actual White House press releases.):

November 2009: “Therefore it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

January 2010: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

March 2010: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

April 2010: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

May 2010: “As always, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

June 2010: “As always, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

August 2010: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.”

July 2010: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, positive or negative.  It is essential that we continue our efforts to move in the right direction and replace job losses with robust job gains.”

September 2010: “Given the volatility in the monthly employment and unemployment data, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

October 2010: “Given the volatility in monthly employment and unemployment data, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

November 2010: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

December 2010: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

January 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

February 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

March 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

April 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

May 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

June 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

July 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

August 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

September 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

October 2011: “The monthly employment and unemployment numbers are volatile and employment estimates are subject to substantial revision. There is no better example than August’s jobs figure, which was initially reported at zero and in the latest revision increased to 104,000. This illustrates why the Administration always stresses it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

November 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

December 2011: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report.”

January 2012: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report; nevertheless, the trend in job market indicators over recent months is an encouraging sign.” (Emphasis added)

February 2012: “Therefore, as the Administration always stresses, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report; nevertheless, the trend in job market indicators over recent months is an encouraging sign.” (Emphasis added)

March 2012: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report, and it is helpful to consider each report in the context of other data that are becoming available.”

April 2012: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report and it is helpful to consider each report in the context of other data that are becoming available.”

May 2012: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report and it is helpful to consider each report in the context of other data that are becoming available.”

June 2012: “Therefore, it is important not to read too much into any one monthly report and it is informative to consider each report in the context of other data that are becoming available.”

Yes – many of the jobs reports are later revised, but it isn’t like the revisions have come in the form of some massive game changing adjustments. Throwing this argument in each time is quite redundant, especially at this point. Romney said it the best: “In any jobs figures, there are going to be factors that come and go that you can’t control, but the things you can control you want to get right,” he said. “In the case of President Obama, this is not a monthly statistic or even a yearly statistic. We’ve looked at now almost four years of policies that have not gotten America working again … It doesn’t have to be this way. America can do better and this kick in the gut has got to end.”

And don’t think the 8.2% unemployment rate is the most accurate number either; CNBC reports that if you include discouraged workers (workers that have not actively sought work in 4 weeks or more because they found no suitable employment options and/or were unsuccessful when applying), the unemployment rate becomes 14.9% – its highest level since February of this year.

Obama, in response to the June jobs report, said, “That’s a step in the right direction.” He added that this economic situation “didn’t happen overnight. We aren’t going to turn it around overnight.” All evidence seems to show that the White House keeps saying the same thing over and over and over. Why should we believe them at this point?

America isn’t reading too much into these jobs reports, Obama’s policies just aren’t working. It’s time for change.

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